Yellow Jack.

Martello Tower, Seaford.

This was at the Martello Tower (small defensive forts that were built across the British Empire during the 19th century, from the time of the French Revolutionary Wars onwards) at Seaford, East Sussex. Interesting!

As a post script to this post an old naval friend contacted me with a bit more information:

“It was flown first in the West Indies when the place was full of yellow fever by the Royal Navy but now it’s flown for other contagious disease.”

Hastings, East Sussex.

View from East Hill

Today was a trip down the coast to Hastings. The town lies between two hills- East and West. It was attacked by the French during the Hundred Years War. The architecture is a fascinating mish-mash of styles ranging from Medieval to Victorian times.

The old town high street (George Street) is a diverse mix of antiquity and modern cosmopolitan. There are cute narrow twittens running off the Main Street up into the cliffs.

Enjoy a game of open air chess in the Old Town square.

Hastings has a thriving fishing community. It’s fleet is the largest in Europe that is launched from a beach as opposed to a quay or harbour.

A local character?

Bench on the East Cliffs.

Lastly Hastings was the birthplace of Grey Owl, a pioneer Of Canada conservation- said to have saved the Canadian beaver from extinction.

Newhaven to Dieppe Ferry.

‘Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore’

Andre Gide

Newhaven Harbour, East Sussex.

Even the humble shores of Newhaven in East Sussex. Newhaven ferry port overlooks the English Channel, one of the busiest shipping channels in the world. It is located on the south coast of England in the county of Sussex at the mouth of the river Ouse. It is the closest port to London with Ferry links to France, and is ideally placed between the seaside resorts of Brighton and Eastbourne with quick and easy access to the rest of the UK.

http://www.newhavenferryport.co.uk/

On my way to work I pass this ferry. The pull to hop on and cross the channel is always there!

The Long Man of Wilmington.

The Long Man of Wilmington

The Long Man of Wilmington situated on the South Downs in Sussex.

Formerly thought to originate in the Iron Age or even the neolithic period, a 2003 archaeological investigation has shown that the figure may have been cut in the Early Modern era – the 16th or 17th century AD. The Long Man is one of two extant human hill figures in East Sussex; the other is the Litlington White Horse, also in East Sussex.

Another autumn walk for us on a bright Sunday on the Sunshine Coast.

Skegness.

Seaside sauce

Description

Skegness (Skeggy) is a seaside town in Lincolnshire, England. On the Lincolnshire coast of the North Sea.

I went to the Butlins Holiday Camp in Skegness as a child. My partner played gigs on Skegness sea front in his early band career. Everyone I know has a Skeggy memory- work day trips, family holidays. Just a mention brings a smile to people’s faces.

Billy Butlin’s slogan was ‘Our True Intent is All For Your Delight’

It was originally a quote from Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Nights Dream. Butlins feels a long way from Shakespeare- but maybe not. They both entertained the masses.

We didn’t go to Butlins on this occasion, but we were delighted in Skegness.

Brighton. Piers and Seafronts.

Brighton is a compact city nestled between the sea and the countryside. It’s just down the coast from where I live in Eastbourne. Today we spent the day on the pier and seafront.

Walking along the seafront towards Hove:

The Every Day Counts Rainbow.
Upside down house.
Bandstand
Constellation by Jonathan Wright, 2018.

Fabulous hotels along the front.

Interesting installation.

Forks.

Brighton Pavillion- built in three stages as a seaside retreat for George Prince I’d Wales, who became Prince Regent in 1811, and King George IV in 1820.

Brighton you are unique, quirky and fabulous.

Rottingdean.

Rottingdean

A few weeks ago we walked to Rottingdean.

Rottingdean is a village in the city of Brighton and Hove, in East Sussex, on the south coast of England. In the background of the picture is Beacon Mill, a smock Mill built in 1802 for the purpose of grinding corn. It is a Three-storey smock with a single-storey base, eight sides, four patent sails, a cast iron wind shaft and fantail winding.

Dean’ in a place name means valley. ‘Rottingdean’ means ‘valley of Rota’s people’ . Rota was probably the name of a Saxon invader, driving out the existing Romano- British settlers.

So from Saxon origins to a quintessentially English seaside village, Rottingdean is well worth a passing visit.

The Cormorant.

Seen on my morning run in Eastbourne Harbour today.

A large and conspicuous waterbird, the cormorant has an almost primitive appearance with its long neck making it appear reptilian. It is often seen standing with its wings held out to dry. Regarded by some as black, sinister and greedy, cormorants are supreme fishers which can bring them into conflict with anglers and they have been persecuted in the past. The UK holds internationally important wintering numbers.

https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wildlife/wildlife-guides/bird-a-z/cormorant/

The Common Cormorant or Shag

by Christopher Isherwood

The Common Cormorant or shag
Lays eggs inside a paper bag.
The reason you will see no doubt
It is to keep the lightning out.
But what these unobservant birds
Have never noticed is that herds
Of wandering bears may come with buns
And steal the bags to hold the crumbs.

Saltdean Lido.

An English lido is a public outdoor swimming pool and surrounding facilities. On a cruise ship the lido deck features outdoor pools and related facilities.

The term comes from Lido, the Italian word for “beach”, and may have found its way into English via English visitors returning from Italy where sea-bathing took place from the late-19th century.

Saltdean Lido in the city of Brighton and Hove, is an Art Deco lido designed by architect R.W.H. Jones. Originally listed at Grade II by English Heritage for its architectural and historical importance, its status was upgraded further to “Grade II*” on 18 March 2011.

https://www.fusion-lifestyle.com/centres/saltdean/

The Lido was one of the sights on our coastal path walk from Peacehaven in East Sussex to the city of Brighton and Hove.

The Greenwich Meridian Line, Peacehaven.

Today we walked a section of the Meridian Trail at Peacehaven. The trail runs through Cambridgeshire, East Yorkshire, East Sussex, Essex, Hertfordshire, Gtr London, Lincolnshire, Surrey, and West Sussex.

Inaugurated in 2009, the route follows the line of the Prime Meridian as closely as practical, using public rights of way, but the route does not rigidly stick to The Meridian line.

The Meridian Monument at Peacehaven is 3.5 meters high. It was unveiled on 10 August 1936.

The Royal Observatory at Greenwich was agreed as Zero Degrees Longitude for the whole world at a conference in America in 1884. Before that time, charts and maps used many different meridians as zero. At the same time, the delegates agreed on the ‘universal day’ which is the same the world over. Each day begins at midnight at Greenwich, thus giving us Greenwich Mean Time. Maritime Greenwich is recognised as a World Heritage Site.

The very blustery Westerly wind made it a breezy July cliff walk but certainly worth doing.