Island Gardens of Garnish, Bantry Bay, Southwest Ireland.

The final, and one of my favourite, stops of our South Western Ireland trip was the beautiful Garnish Island- reached by a short ferry trip from the village of Glengarriff, overlooking the waters of Bantry Bay and set against the back drop of the Caha Mountains.

Garnish island extends to 37 acres and is renowned for its gardens which flourish in the mild humid micro climate of Glengarriff harbour assisted by a pine shelter belt.

Italian garden Garnish Island.

A damp visit that in no way took away the beauty of the island- I was entranced. On the way over we passed Seal Island. The ferryman drew in close, allowing us to say hello and take some photos.

It was an enchanting and enriching afternoon and a lovely conclusion to our road trip.

Home

https://www.newmarketholidays.co.uk/holidays/europe/irelands-beautiful-south-west

Cobh, Western Ireland

The departure town for over three million Irish Emigrants and final port of call for the RMS Titanic. We visited the Cobh Heritage Cente, which tells the story of Irish emigration through to the 1950s and traces the history of Cobh over the centuries. Starting with the indentured servants who were transported to the colonies to work on the plantations in the 17th century, to Annie Moore, who with her two brothers were the first emigrants to be processed on the newly opened Ellis Island in New York in 1891.

https://www.newmarketholidays.co.uk/holidays/europe/ring-of-kerry-and-wonderful-western-ireland

Ring of Kerry. Western Ireland.

A Road trip of Road trips today. The stunning Ring of Kerry. Starting in Kenmare, this is a 110 mile circular route around the Iveragh Peninsular covering stunning views, charming towns, rugged forests, gushing waterfalls, all edged by the rolling, crashing waves of The Atlantic Ocean. It was a sublime journey, covering breathtaking land and seascapes. Key stages of the journey included the Coomakista Pass, Macgillycuddy’s Reeks, Molls Gap, Skellig Micheal in the Atlantic, Waterville village and Cahersiveen.

‘And some time make the time to drive out west
… along the Flaggy Shore,
In September or October, when the wind
And the light are working off each other
So that the ocean on one side is wild
With foam and glitter…’

Seamus Heaney, Postscript.

It was a long day, but a memorable one. https://www.newmarketholidays.co.uk/holidays/europe/ring-of-kerry-and-wonderful-western-ireland

Charlie Chaplin.

“You’ll never find a rainbow if you’re looking down.”

Charlie Chaplin (1888- 1977)

A short stop in Waterville today. A small town on the Wild Atlantic Way, Western Ireland where Charlie Chaplin, English comic actor, filmmaker, and composer who rose to fame in the era of silent film, liked to holiday.

https://www.newmarketholidays.co.uk/holidays/europe/ring-of-kerry-and-wonderful-western-ireland

Clonakilty, Timoleague and Kinsale. Western Ireland.

Timoleague, Western Ireland.

Day one of my Western Irish tour started in Clonakilty, birthplace of Micheal Collins (1890-1922), Irish revolutionary, soldier and politician who was a leading figure in the early-20th century struggle for Irish independence.

Next stop was Timoleague, a small village where the ruins of a thirteenth century Franciscan abbey stands picturesquely at the waters edge.

Kinsale, a harbour town with a maze of narrow streets and an eclectic mix of bars, restaurants and shops was the next stop.

Kinsale, Western Ireland.

It was raining hard during my visit here, but it’s Western Ireland and it’s October… It took nothing away from the beauty of the location.

Last stop of the day was Charles Fort, just outside of Kinsale. A star-shaped military fortress that has stood firm for centuries. It was raining even harder by now, but the fort was totally worth getting drenched for.

Despite being partially ruined, you could imagine the soldiers and their families living in this fortress.

https://heritageireland.ie/places-to-visit/charles-fort-national-monument/

Charles Fort.

https://www.newmarketholidays.co.uk/holidays/europe/ring-of-kerry-and-wonderful-western-ireland

A Brighton Blast!

A late summer Sunday at Brighton Beach making the most of the weather before it breaks and autumn sets in.

Loads of fun at The Upside Down House.

Brighton

A browse through an art installation on the beach…

These deck chairs were just waiting for us!

And finally the, in a rugged way, beautiful West pier.

Photograph by Emily Dudley.

I never stop feeling blessed living on the South Coast.

Jurassic Coast, Dorset.

A hazy Durdle Door, Dorset.

One of the most famous stone arches in the world. This spectacular natural doorway was formed over 10,000 years ago on the Jurassic Coast in Dorset from merged bays. Geologists suggest that the rock arch in the sea was formed as a result of softer rock eroding behind hard limestone, allowing the sea to pound through.

It’s a fairytale area- the place of myths and legends.

Somewhere to appreciate the coastline, walk for miles, or just enjoy the water…

Photography by Emily Dudley.

https://instagram.com/chaos_and_mayhem21?utm_medium=copy_link

Brownsea Island , Dorset.

Brownsea Island is the largest of the islands in Poole Harbour in the county of Dorset, England. The island is owned by the National Trust with the northern half managed by the Dorset Wildlife Trust.

I have this goal to travel to the islands around the UK and this has been on my list for a couple of years. It was well worth the wait, although COVID restrictions limited our time there. lots of woodland, coastland and wildlife. Amazing experience.

Winchelsea, East Sussex.

Today’s walk involved a mini road trip down to Winchelsea in East Sussex, about twenty miles up the coast from my home town in Eastbourne.

The ancient town of Winchelsea, about one and a half miles inland from Winchelsea Beach was once a busy harbour-part of the Cinque-Port alliance. The old town was destroyed by floods in the 13th century, and today the sea has receded some distance from the town.

Parking by the recreation ground we followed an adjacent path to the seafront, taking in quirky homes and proper English countryside. The geese flew over, as did lots of small bi-planes- we were close to Lid airport- and the cuckoo sang loud and long:

What do you do?

In April, I open my bill
In May, I sing night and day
In June, I change my tune
In July, far off I fly
In August, away
I must…

Sang to me as a child in the 1970s by my mother.

Prevailing Winds.

Loved these trees on our walk this morning. Guess which way the wind blows…!

In the UK the most common winds (known as the prevailing winds) are from the west or south-west. These winds arrive in Britain after crossing the Atlantic Ocean, from which they pick up moisture.

‘O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn’s being,
Thou, from whose unseen presence the leaves dead
Are driven, like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing…’

Ode to the West Wind, Percy Bysshe Shelley 1792- 1822.