Watch her Vanish by Ellery Kane.

Today I have a pitch for Watch Her Vanish by Ellery Kane.

‘Do you want to explore the mind of a murderer? What is it that makes someone take a person’s life or commit a violent crime? Forensic psychologist Ellery Kane has worked on some of the most interesting murder and criminal cases in California. She spends her days evaluating violent criminals and opining about their violence risk. At night, she weaves elements of her day job into her books. Ellery Kane is also a writer of popular thrillers, and she will tell your audience that real life is often stranger than fiction! Her latest release, Watch Her Vanish, is loosely based on her adventures as a forensic psychologist in California.

https://play.google.com/store/books/details?pcampaignid=books_read_action&id=S2XxDwAAQBAJ

Love a good crime novel now and again so look forward to reading this one.

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Newhaven to Dieppe Ferry.

‘Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore’

Andre Gide

Newhaven Harbour, East Sussex.

Even the humble shores of Newhaven in East Sussex. Newhaven ferry port overlooks the English Channel, one of the busiest shipping channels in the world. It is located on the south coast of England in the county of Sussex at the mouth of the river Ouse. It is the closest port to London with Ferry links to France, and is ideally placed between the seaside resorts of Brighton and Eastbourne with quick and easy access to the rest of the UK.

http://www.newhavenferryport.co.uk/

On my way to work I pass this ferry. The pull to hop on and cross the channel is always there!

Create, Share and Save Money Using Open- Source Projects by Joshua M. Pearce.

Today I have a guest post from Joshua M. Pearce and a link to his book Create Share and Save Money…

Below is the link to the digital publication https://www.appropedia.org/Create,_Share,_and_Save_Money_Using_Open-Source_Projects

Designed for beginners, this guide is filled with ways to save money by making use of free and open-source technologies on a wide range of products. The book covers the potential of DIY manufacturing and recycling projects and even how to score deeply discounted big-ticket items, including furniture, housing and electricity.

I am especially interested in chapter two: Making and Sharing Recipes, Life Hacks and Household Tips. In fact the more I browse through the link, the more interested I am to purchase the book.

Published by McGraw Hill and available from 30 October 2020. Very apt for the current climate.

Goblin Market (again)

By Christina Rossetti

Stumbled across this guy on a walk at the weekend. So had to do another Goblin Market post…!

Batemans, Burwash East Sussex.

‘…

So without further parleying,
If you will not sell me any
Of your fruits though much and many,
Give me back my silver penny
I toss’d you for a fee.”—
They began to scratch their pates,
No longer wagging, purring,
But visibly demurring,
Grunting and snarling.
One call’d her proud,
Cross-grain’d, uncivil;
Their tones wax’d loud,
Their looks were evil.
Lashing their tails
They trod and hustled her,
Elbow’d and jostled her,
Claw’d with their nails,
Barking, mewing, hissing, mocking,
Tore her gown and soil’d her stocking,
Twitch’d her hair out by the roots,
Stamp’d upon her tender feet,
Held her hands and squeez’d their fruits
Against her mouth to make her eat…’

(Extract)

The Secret Garden.

Bateman’s Robin. Burwash East Sussex.

‘The robin flew from his swinging spray of ivy on to the top of the wall and he opened his beak and sang a loud, lovely trill, merely to show off. Nothing in the world is quite as adorably lovely as a robin when he shows off—and they are nearly always doing it.’

The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett. Chapter 8. “The Robin Who Showed the Way.

An autumn walk around Bateman’s gardens and this engaging robin reminded me of Frances Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden. A childhood favourite book.

Avon. Door to Door Sales.

This year during lockdown I became an Avon representative. So I did a little research on the history of Avon the Company.

In 1886, David H. McConnell founded the California Perfume Company, which would become Avon, in New York City

David H McConnell.

The company started calling itself Avon in 1928, named after the birthplace of McConnell’s favorite playwright, Shakespeare.) The door-to-door formula for perfume sales was ideal for the time period.

In 1886, 34 years before women in the U.S. earned the right to vote, Avon’s founder, David H. McConnell, helped give them the chance to earn an independent income. He didn’t set out to create a beauty company. In fact, McConnell was a traveling book salesperson who offered fragrances samples as an additional perk to his female customers. He saw that these women were more interested in the free perfume than the books. Since women had a passion for his products and loved networking with other women, McConnell was inspired to recruit them as Sales Representatives. From a small New York City office, McConnell himself mixed the company’s first fragrances.This began Avon’s long history of empowering women around the globe.

Avon’s first product was the Little Dot Perfume Set. By the end of the first year of business, the company had a line of nearly 20 different fragrances. In 1902, the company was selling a full range of cosmetics. In 1931, 11 products received the coveted Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval.

Avon UK opened in 1959 and and it’s estimated there are around 160,000 reps in Britain.

Avon Parfums

The first Avon lady, Mrs. P.F.E Albee affectionately named the “Mother of the California Perfume Company”, began selling the inaugural scents when she was 50.

Today Avon is still selling perfumes and still empowering women through its support of women’s charities including breast cancer, ending gender based violence and Changing Faces, the charity for people with visible differences.

I’m proud to be an Avon Rep for it’s history, it’s charity work and it’s quality products at affordable prices.

http://www.avon.uk.com/store/MichelesBeautyShop

The Long Man of Wilmington.

The Long Man of Wilmington

The Long Man of Wilmington situated on the South Downs in Sussex.

Formerly thought to originate in the Iron Age or even the neolithic period, a 2003 archaeological investigation has shown that the figure may have been cut in the Early Modern era – the 16th or 17th century AD. The Long Man is one of two extant human hill figures in East Sussex; the other is the Litlington White Horse, also in East Sussex.

Another autumn walk for us on a bright Sunday on the Sunshine Coast.

Charcoal Burning in the High Weald.

Charcoal burning is one of the world’s oldest crafts dating back to pre-Roman times. It has a long history in the High Weald, being used in the production of iron from the time of the Roman occupation. Low value, coppiced or ‘waste’ wood is normally used for charcoal production.

http://www.highweald.org › local-products

National Trust
Charcoal Burner

An wet autumn walk in the High Weald and a bit of history about ancient woodland.

Bloody Brilliant Women by Cathy Newman

Bloody Brilliant Women: The Pioneers, Revolutionaries and Geniuses Your History Teacher Forgot to Mention by Cathy Newman

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Bloody Brilliant Women by Cathy Newman

A celebration of brilliant women through the centuries, from the Saxon women who were near equal to men and had influence and freedom of intervention in public affairs, up to the present day. A twenty first century of #MeToo, the public movement against sexual abuse and harassment of women by powerful and prominent men; and #HeForShe the male ally ship for gender equality. Where did it all go wrong for women in between? The equality women had in the Saxons, lost and despite spending centuries fighting for, never quite regained is brilliantly told in this informative social history. Kept me entertained on the journey to and from work for a week.



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Village Cricket.

“You don’t win or lose the games because of 11 you select. You win or lose with what those 11 do on the field.”

Rahul Dravid

Cricket Pavilion Sheffield Park

A key part of cricket is the pavilion- the main building in which the players usually change and the main location for watching the cricket match for members and others.

It’s also the epitome of Englishness- the place where the ‘cricket teas’ are served. Pots of tea, sandwiches, sausage rolls, scones, cream and jam and of course cake. Summertime personified.

The 2020 cricket season is now over, for what it was worth this year, in England. Let’s hope village cricket has a better ‘run’ in 2021.

Tree folklore.

Ents are a race of beings in J. R. R. Tolkien’s fantasy world Middle-earth who closely resemble trees. They are similar to the talking trees in folklore around the world. Their name is derived from the Old English word for giant.

en.m.wikipedia.org › wiki › Ent

I like to think that Sheffield Park Gardens in East Sussex has its own Ents.

Autumn walk and trees and toadstools. Magical season.