Cheltenham.

Picture vignettes of our whistle stop tour of Cheltenham.

Gustav Holst. Born in Cheltenham.
Neptune’s Fountain.

Finished the day with a couple of glasses of wine and a steak dinner in Wetherspoons.

Making our way back to the South Coast tomorrow. We stayed in the Cirencester Travel Lodge. Faultless and very central to everything!

https://www.travelodge.co.uk/hotels/86/Cirencester-hotel?WT_tsrc=GHA_Organic&utm_campaign=GHA_Cirencester&utm_medium=GHA_Organic&utm_source=google

Bourton-on-the-Water.

Day two of our Cotswolds road trip took us to Bourton-on-the-Water, in the rural Cotswolds area of south central England. Straddling the River Windrush, it’s known for its low bridges and traditional stone houses.

We walked part of the Windrush path and visited the cute little model village of Bourton-on-the-Water.

You really feel like you are in the heart of England in Bourton-on-the-Water. It was a beautiful morning.

The Thames Head.

The Thames is one of the most iconic rivers in the world and the longest river entirely in England, the second longest in the UK. Its source is at Thames Head, near Kemble, in a meadow called Trewsbury Mead in the Cotswolds- marked by a headstone.

We made this the first stop in our whistle stop, two night tour of The Cotswolds in Gloucestershire.

We visited at a bit of an iconic moment for the river source. For the first time at least since 1976, apparently ,this source of the Thames has dried up.

Walking further long the Thames path we came to the Sapperton Canal Tunnel and one of five round houses on the Thames and Severn Canal- all former lengthsmen’s cottages built along the canal between Chalford and Lechdale and constructed in the 1790s when the canal was built.

Lengthsmen were responsible for lengths of towpath and, in the absence of a lock-keeper, for the locks. Other duties, included management of water levels, control of weirs, repair and maintenance of banks on their “length”, including cutting reeds and vegetation and treading puddle clay into sections of bank which were leaking or weak.

It was a lovely warm early autumnal afternoon. The hedges were full of berries, the trees bearing fruits nuts and leaves on the turn. A welcoming introduction to our first visit to The Cotswolds.

John Keats, ‘To Autumn’.

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run;
To bend with apples the moss’d cottage-trees,
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease,
For summer has o’er-brimm’d their clammy cells …

A beautiful autumn walk in The Cotswolds.