Southease and Rodmell, East Sussex.

Today we parked up at Southease and walked across the fields and along the River Ouse to Rodmell.

Southease is a small village west of the River Ouse. It has a church, a small railway station and a youth hostel:

https://www.yha.org.uk/hostel/yha-south-downs?utm_source=google&utm_medium=maps&utm_campaign=google-places#hostel-location-map

YHA South Downs
St Peter’s church Southease

Rodmell is a small village nestling in the South Downs and lying in the lower valley of the Ouse. There has been a village here since the time of William the Conqueror.

It was about a five mile round trip on a beautiful early November autumn day.

Happy Halloween 🎃

“Trick or Treat! Give me something good to eat. Give me candy. Give me cake. Give me something sweet to take!” “Trick or treat’…

Halloween- also known as Allhalloween, All Hallows’ Eve, or All Saints’ Eve, is a celebration observed in many countries on 31 October, the eve of the Western Christian feast of All Hallows’ Day.

The tradition originated with the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain, when people would light bonfires and wear costumes to ward off ghosts.

Halloween will be different this year with Covid 19 showing no signs of going away. However we can still carve and display our pumpkins, cook our Halloween food and scare ourselves with a horror movie.

Happy Halloween…!

The Secret Garden.

Bateman’s Robin. Burwash East Sussex.

‘The robin flew from his swinging spray of ivy on to the top of the wall and he opened his beak and sang a loud, lovely trill, merely to show off. Nothing in the world is quite as adorably lovely as a robin when he shows off—and they are nearly always doing it.’

The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett. Chapter 8. “The Robin Who Showed the Way.

An autumn walk around Bateman’s gardens and this engaging robin reminded me of Frances Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden. A childhood favourite book.

The Long Man of Wilmington.

The Long Man of Wilmington

The Long Man of Wilmington situated on the South Downs in Sussex.

Formerly thought to originate in the Iron Age or even the neolithic period, a 2003 archaeological investigation has shown that the figure may have been cut in the Early Modern era – the 16th or 17th century AD. The Long Man is one of two extant human hill figures in East Sussex; the other is the Litlington White Horse, also in East Sussex.

Another autumn walk for us on a bright Sunday on the Sunshine Coast.

Charcoal Burning in the High Weald.

Charcoal burning is one of the world’s oldest crafts dating back to pre-Roman times. It has a long history in the High Weald, being used in the production of iron from the time of the Roman occupation. Low value, coppiced or ‘waste’ wood is normally used for charcoal production.

http://www.highweald.org › local-products

National Trust
Charcoal Burner

An wet autumn walk in the High Weald and a bit of history about ancient woodland.

Tree folklore.

Ents are a race of beings in J. R. R. Tolkien’s fantasy world Middle-earth who closely resemble trees. They are similar to the talking trees in folklore around the world. Their name is derived from the Old English word for giant.

en.m.wikipedia.org › wiki › Ent

I like to think that Sheffield Park Gardens in East Sussex has its own Ents.

Autumn walk and trees and toadstools. Magical season.