The Royal Crescent, Bath.

We had a little Road Trip down to Dorset and Somerset a couple of weekends ago. The weather was rubbish so we went inland to the city of Bath.

A true high point for me was the Royal Crescent.

This is one of Bath’s most iconic landmarks, was built between 1767 and 1775 and designed by John Wood the Younger. This impressive landmark is arranged around a perfect lawn overlooking Royal Victoria Park and forms a sweeping crescent of 30 Grade I Listed terrace houses.

It is iconically Georgian. I wanted to look behind that sweeping bank of closed doors. Have a wander. Stay a night. Play at being mega rich.

Oh! There was also a cricket pitch…

We didn’t do the Roman Baths- the obvious Bath attraction. Still in COVID times pre- booking online is the way to go- obviously 🤦🏽‍♀️.

The Power of the Dog

Rudyard Kipling – 1865-1936

There is sorrow enough in the natural way
From men and women to fill our day;
And when we are certain of sorrow in store,
Why do we always arrange for more?
Brothers and Sisters, I bid you beware
Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.

Buy a pup and your money will buy
Love unflinching that cannot lie—
Perfect passion and worship fed
By a kick in the ribs or a pat on the head.
Nevertheless it is hardly fair
To risk your heart for a dog to tear.

When the fourteen years which Nature permits
Are closing in asthma, or tumour, or fits,
And the vet’s unspoken prescription runs
To lethal chambers or loaded guns,
Then you will find—it’s your own affair—
But… you’ve given your heart to a dog to tear.

When the body that lived at your single will,
With its whimper of welcome, is stilled (how still!).
When the spirit that answered your every mood
Is gone—wherever it goes—for good,
You will discover how much you care,
And will give your heart to a dog to tear.

We’ve sorrow enough in the natural way,
When it comes to burying Christian clay.
Our loves are not given, but only lent,
At compound interest of cent per cent.
Though it is not always the case, I believe,
That the longer we’ve kept ’em, the more do we grieve:
For, when debts are payable, right or wrong,
A short-time loan is as bad as a long—
So why in—Heaven (before we are there)
Should we give our hearts to a dog to tear?

Brownsea Island , Dorset.

Brownsea Island is the largest of the islands in Poole Harbour in the county of Dorset, England. The island is owned by the National Trust with the northern half managed by the Dorset Wildlife Trust.

I have this goal to travel to the islands around the UK and this has been on my list for a couple of years. It was well worth the wait, although COVID restrictions limited our time there. lots of woodland, coastland and wildlife. Amazing experience.

Find Them Dead by Peter James

Find Them Dead (Roy Grace, #16)

Find Them Dead by Peter James

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


My first Peter James and #Roy Grace. I’m hooked. Clever story telling with historic and literary references woven in. Set on the Sussex coast with lots of local mentions,’ Find Them Dead’ covers County Lines drug runs, a detailed court case, including jury nobbling, an in-depth insight into the workings of Sussex Police. An interesting ending that I didn’t see coming. Brilliant.



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Brighton’s Back Passages.

Today we followed the ‘Brighton’s Back Passages’ walk (p.46) from the above by David Bramwell, John Ashton, and Tim Bick.

Starting at Morrison’s supermarket in Kemp Town, the first back passage was a tunnel- shaped covered alley.

A few passages later we hit Quadrophenia Alley ‘where Jimmy and Steph get it on…’ and apparently ‘Fans have been known to re-enact the love scene here’.

The next Alley off Little East Street had ‘ambient music installed in an attempt to calm passing drunk vandals… and has been decorated by legendary Japanese street artist Lady Aiko.’

Many more alleys followed.

Items of interest included:

Brighton’s smallest pub and. ‘… it’s hardest to find.’
A pull bell.
Fake door- created for the set of the film Wimbledon and has never been removed.
Pub by Brighton station
Max Miller Statue, Pavilion Gardens.

The Brighton’s Back Passages walk finished at the lovely Brighton Pavilion.

Brighton Pavilion.

We started the walk off with coffee and cake at The Flour Pot Bakery.

And finished with a chilled Sauvignon Blanc at the Theatre Royal.

The walk was brilliant. Cheeky Walks spot on and very easy to follow. We didn’t loose our way at all. A first for us…!

Cherry 🍒 Sussex Summer.

Cherry-ripe, ripe, ripe, I cry,
Full and fair ones; come, and buy:
If so be you ask me where
They do grow? I answer, there
Where my Julia’s lips do smile;–
There’s the land, or cherry-isle;
Whose plantations fully show
All the year where cherries grow.

Robert Herrick (1591-1674) English poet.

I know that summer has truely arrived when the cherries are for sale on the Sussex roadside. Grown in the neighbouring county of Kent, you will not come across a finer cherry 🍒